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Like  yummy cocktails and fantastic atmospheres? Have you been to Mama Shelter?

Well, in my opinion it’s the perfect place to go on a Friday night. Or any night for that matter. And it’s in a unique neighborhood that not many venture out to it seems like. Hidden up way in the 20th district of Paris, Mama Shelter is not only a bar, restaurant and pizzeria, but also a hotel. It’s certainly an untouched and beautifully undiscovered part of Paris, so you should go take a stroll around there too.

The bartenders at this bar have a little something extra to offer with their unique and deliciously clever cocktails- you’re bound to taste something you’ve never tasted before. At a whopping 10-15 euros a cocktail, you’ll get your money’s worth, I assure you that. Even make a rezo for dinner in their restaurant or for a pizza in their pizzeria (SO GOOD). I hear their brunch is the bomb…

Mama Shelter
109 Rue de Bagnolet, 75020
Tél: 01 43 48 48 48
Métro: Gambetta (3/2)

This is one of the treasures of Belleville. I’m a big fan of this area and this café/bar never lets me down. The bright lights and busy streets on which it sits make for the perfect setting for people watching. With the winter chill, it’s an adorable place to stop by for a coffee or beverage to warm up.

Annie, Caroline and I wandered this area once upon a time and explored the decorated and eclectic streets of the different districts that all meet at this intersection in Belleville, and let me tell you… It’s full of charm! It’s something I find myself trying to do often enough to step out of the Parisian box as there are so many areas that are off the beaten path.

The diversity of Paris’s districts always make me love this city even more.

Aux Folies
8 rue de Belleville, 75020
Tél: 01 46 36 65 98
Métro: Belleville (line 2 /11)

The 20th is one of the districts of Paris that in many ways remains untouched.

The stroll began right at the exit of metro stop Alexandre Dumas, which falls on the intersection of Boulevard Charonne and Rue de Bagnolet— which is also the border of the 11th and 20th districts.

Miss Annie (the homie of mine who knows all things concerning Parisian history, and thus is the instigator of such strolls) met up with me and we started to wander eastwards up Rue de Bagnolet. Annie lived in this area during a study abroad when she was 16, so she knew the area pretty well, despite the radical changes and gentrification it had been through in the recent years. The street is filled with little shops, cafés, bars and tucked away villas filling the street with color. On this little hike you’ll pass Le Merle Moqeur on the left, which is a preciously kitsch bookshop with loads of accessories and stationary-like goodies. If you keep wandering in the same direction you’ll come across of two of the most amazing thingsthis part of town has to offer: La Flèche D’Or and Mama Shelter.

Both of these little havens rest right upon La Petite Ceinture, which is an old railroad track that circles Paris. It has been deserted for years, but still illustrates a little hint of history every time you see it near the Parisian inner walls (photographed above). It’s a good question why it’s not in use, but the debate continues concerning what to do with it. La Flèche D’Or, one of Paris’s highlight concert venues, is an old station from the railroad and keeps it’s spunk with the evacuation stairs leading down to the tracks and of course the views of the tracks from the bar/café upstairs.

After a few ooh’s and ahh’s over the preciousness of both of these venues, we wandered up to see Place Edith Piaf, by metro Porte de Bagnolet. This little place sports the name of one of France’s most famous icons, who was known to have come from the 20th district of Paris.

This part of town lead us to the northern rim of Cimitère Père Lachaise, one of the most beautiful cemeteries in Paris (I mean, they’re all stunning). Icons such as Jim Morrison and Oscar Wilde are buried in this cemetery. Autumn was the perfect time to stroll here, as the sidewalks were covered in orange and golden leaves…..luckily we didn’t catch any rain that day. You can see some photos of Père Lachaise in the fall by Making Magique right here. Up from Père Lachaise cemetery is where the 20th merges with the other districts (11th & 19th), near the depths of Belleville. Right before- however-  you’ll pass Menilmontant, an area that is also bustling with life. Right east of the Menilmontant metro on rue Menilmontant is Paris’s oldest and most well known “squatters” paradise, La Miroiterie (also a concert venue, gallery, bar etc…). On the way back down rue Menilmontant, stop and get an Algerian pastry in one of the local shops. They are delicious.

Now Up to Belleville. (By the way, you can read more on the entirety of Belleville right here,.. because it sits on a few different Parisian districts, this post focuses simply on the southeast side of the petite ville toute jolie). Belleville is one of the parts of Paris that all people should wander a little bit. Its rich colliding-of-cultures make it a rich adventure worth taking. Beyond the cafés and busy streets are abandoned alleys filled with street art and other amazing outdoor installations. In this area is also La Bellevilloise, which is a great place for all things artsy. Check their website for upcoming events and the likes- even stop in for a coffee. If you wander back enough you’ll hit le Parc de Belleville, which from the top has a stunning view of all of Paris. Heading north you’ll go until the southern border of the 19th. Sometimes I wonder how I did not discover these places until now, after 4 years of living here. These areas are what make up the true Paris. The untouched Paris.

Go on now, discover this part of Paris. You won’t even feel like you’re in Paris- which is simply exciting. Paris has so much to offer outside of the cliche everyday central things- it’s worth a gander.

. . . . .

Some Random Suggestions in the 20th:

A la Vièrge de la Réunion – Bar à vins – Maraîchers

Aux Folies de Belleville - Bar, Café, Brasserie – Belleville

La Bellevilloise - Concert venue, Art Space, Café – Ménilmontant / Pelleport

Le Comptoir des Mots – Bookstore  - Gambetta

Confluences Maison des Arts Urbains – Art Space / Gallery – Philippe Auguste / Alexandre Dumas

La Féline – Dive Bar – Ménilmontant

La Flèche D’Or – Concert Venue, Bar, Club - Alexandre Dumas / Porte de Bagnolet

La Flûte de Gana – Boulangerie – Gambetta / Pelleport

La Mer à Boire – Bar – Pyrénées

Le Merle Moqeur – Bookstore – Alexandre Dumas

Les Mondes Bohèmes – Restaurant, Wine Bar, Gallery – Alexandre Dumas

Les Pères Populaires - Bar – Buzenval / Avron

Le Poisson Bleu – Wine Bar – Alexandre Dumas

Mama Shelter - Hotel, Restaurant, Bar – Alexandre Dumas / Porte de Bagnolet

La Miroiterie – Espace particulier – Menilmontant

O Mille et Une Fèves - Chocolaterie – Alexandre Dumas

Le Studio de l’Ermitage – Performing Arts Centre / Music Venue – Ménilmontant / Saint-Fargeau

Z’indems Café – Bar / Restaurant – Alexandre Dumas

[Photos in the 20th arrondissement this week via Instagram]

As I repeat over and over… Paris in the autumn is magical.

With the slight chill and colorful leaves it’s the perfect opportunity toget out and discover a new part of the city you live in (there’s more to be said where that came from….post on the 20th in the making after a wonderful adventure this past Tuesday).

Have a happy Friday, and a beautiful weekend.

Belleville (line 2 & 11) is a magical part of Paris. It’s also a part of Paris where you almost feel like you’re not even in Paris anymore. That is the beauty of Belleville. This week we wandered over from the Canal to take some pictures on Rue Denoyez- a street filled with graffiti, and not far from an even more immense representation. Surrounded by ethnic vendors and hole-in-the-wall shops, you can find precious cafés with open seating such as Café Aux Follies. If you wander from the metro north alongside the Café Aux Follies- take a right onto Rue Denoyez, crossing the alley and at the end taking a left, and then another left when you see an empty area. This abandoned lot is filled with graffiti, where once upon a time I took these photos years ago in the same spot:When I first came to Paris I was taking a course combining two different disciplines : Politics and Comparative Literature – but all concerning Paris. One of our first walking tours we went to Belleville, described as one of the parts of Paris where so many artists and citizens of different cultures, nationalities, and backgrounds could live together in one area. To this day it still bears a strong mix of different cultures which reflects the feeling you get when walking through Belleville.

More to come on Belleville and the 19th and 20th in the future. I’d love to explore more around there and go up towards Buttes aux Chaumont and the canal (easing towards the 10th arrondissement). There is so much to see, jeez.

“Belleville is not a zoo, it’s a jungle.”

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